Skip to main content
Menu

Sales: 800-390-9355 (TTY 711)

Current Members: 800-477-8768 (TTY 711)

Hours: Monday-Friday 9 am-8 pm

Screenings & Immunizations


Plan Ahead for Your Health


Keeping to the recommended schedule for screenings and immunizations can be tricky. Here you'll find the basics on what screenings and procedures you should get and how often based on your age and gender. Your primary care provider is also a great resource.


Adult Screening and Immunization Guidelines


Find recommendations below for how often you should be screened for certain conditions for those age 18-64. Find screening recommendations for age 65+ at Medicare Prevention & Education.

Screening/Procedure Recommended Frequency:
  18-29 30-39 40-49 50-64
General physical exam, health counseling and overall assessment 18-21 annually, 21-29 every 1-3 years. Every 1 or 2 years, depending on risk factors.
Cancer Screenings 18-29 30-39 40-49 50-64
Breast Cancer All women should be familiar with how their breasts normally feel and report any changes to their provider immediately. Mammograms for women age 40-49: Talk to your doctor about when to start and how often. Mammograms every two years for women age 50-74 based on your doctor's recommendations.
Cervical Cancer 21-29: Pap test and pelvic exam every three years. Pap test and HPV every five years or screen with a pap test alone every three years.
Testicular & Prostate Cancer Clinical testicular exam and self-exam instruction every one to three years at physician’s discretion. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing:Offered at age 45 for men at high risk.At age 50+ follow the recommendations
Digital rectal exam (DRE) for patients at high risk.Discuss risks and benefits of PSA testing with your doctor.
Skin Cancer Routine cancer-related check-ups during periodic health examinations beginning at age 20. Monthly self-examination is recommended for all individuals.
Colorectal Cancer Not routine except for patients at high risk or positive family history. Screenings start at age 50 with frequency either every five or 10 years depending on test type.
Screenings For: 18-29 30-39 40-49 50-64
Blood Pressure At every doctor’s visit.
Cholesterol Initial screening if not previously tested. Every five years with fasting lipoprotein profile. Every three years with fasting lipoprotein profile
Diabetes Every three years beginning at age 45.Patients who have risk factors such as: age, family history, high blood glucose, overweight, etc., screen more often and at a younger age. Physicians should evaluate blood glucose control and disease complications.
Glaucoma At least once between ages 20-29. Every three to five years if at risk or of African descent. At least twice between ages 30-39. Every two to four years if at risk or of African descent. Every two to four years between ages 40-64.
Osteoporosis Not routine. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) testing in women age 65 and older and in younger women at greater risk of fracture
Other All Tests once at baseline: Urinalysis, CBC (RBC), hemoglobin, hematocrit, WBC, rubella titer (females).
Infectious Disease Screenings: 18-29 30-39 40-49 50-64
Sexually Transmitted Infections (Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis) For Chlamydia and Gonorrhea: Annual screenings for sexually active if under age 25.Patients 25 and over: Screen annually, if at risk. Screen all pregnant women if at risk.For Syphilis: Screen if at risk. Advise about risk factors for STDs.
HIV Universal counseling. Periodic testing of all patients at risk. Screen all pregnant women.
Hepatitis C Screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in persons at high risk for infection.
Tuberculosis (PPD or Tine Test) Tuberculin skin testing for all patients at high risk.
Immunizations 18-29 30-39 40-49 50-64
Seasonal Influenza One dose annually
Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMR) One or two doses if not previously immunized or have not had measles, mumps or rubella.
Pneumococcal If high risk and not previously immunized: one or two doses
Tetanus-Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap or TD) Administer a one-time dose of Tdap to those who have not received a dose previously. Then boost with TD every 10 years.
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Two or three doses depending on when initiated: Women through age 26 and men through age 21 if not previously immunized.Men may be vaccinated from ages 22 to 26 if risk factors are present. Second and third dose should be two and six months after first dose.
Hepatitis A If high risk, two doses. Second dose should be six to 12 months or six to 18 months after first dose
Hepatitis B If high risk, three doses. Second dose one month after first dose. Third dose at least two months after second dose.
Meningococcal (MenACWY), Meningococcal B (MenB) If high risk, one or more doses. Revaccination interval is five years.
Varicella (Chickenpox) Two doses if no evidence of immunity or a second dose if only one dose had been given previously.
Herpes Zoster (Shingles) Not routine. Two doses for adults 50 years of age and older.

 


Pediatric & Adolescent Preventive Guidelines

Screening/Procedure Recommended Frequency:
  0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Well care visits Newborn evaluation within 3 to 5 days of birth and within 48 to 72 hours of discharge.Breastfeeding infants should receive evaluation and instruction within 3-5 days of birth.1, 2, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months. Ages 12, 15, 18, 24 and 30 months, and ages 3 and 4 years. Annually for ages 5-18.
Screenings and Routine Labs 0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Anemia: Hgb/Hct Once between birth and 2 months. Risk assessment at 4 months. At risk should be screened at ages 1-5. Screen at 1 year of age. Risk assessment at 18 and 24 months and from ages 3-18
Lead Risk assessments at 6 and 9 months. If at risk, screen at age 1. Risk assessments at 18 months and 3 and 4 years of age. If at risk, screen at age 2. Risk assessment at 5 and 6 years of age Not routine
Urinalysis Not routine. Not routine. Once at age 5 or physician’s discretion. Once between ages 11-18 and annually for those who are sexually active.
Cholesterol Not routine. Screen once between ages 9 to 11 and ages 17 to 18.
Blood Pressure Not routine. Every routine visit starting at age 3.
T4/TSH Between 2 and 4 days of age. Not routine.
Sensory Screenings 0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Hearing Newborn prior to discharge or by age 1 month Hearing test at ages 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10. If test is performed in another setting, such as a school, it does not need to be repeated, but findings should be documented in child’s medical record.Subjective assessment at all other routine checkups.
Vision/Eye Care Newborn prior to discharge. Visual acuity test at ages 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 years. If test is performed in another setting, such as a school, it does not need to be repeated, but findings should be documented in child’s medical record. Visual acuity between ages 3-5 years.
Infectious Disease Screenings 0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Hepatitis C Not routine. Test after age 12 months in children with hepatitis C virus-infected mothers. Not routine. Periodic testing of all patients at high risk.
Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculin skin testing of all patients at high risk. Tuberculin skin testing of all patients at high risk. Screen patients with risk factors and all pregnant adolescents.
HIV Not routine. Screen patients with risk factors and all pregnant adolescents.
Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Not routine. For chlamydia and gonorrhea: Annually screen all sexually active patients and pregnant adolescents if at risk.For syphilis: Screen sexually active and pregnant adolescents at risk. Counsel regarding safe and healthy sexual behaviors, including abstinence.
Cancer Screening 0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Cervical Cancer Not routine.
Testicular Exam Not routine.
Skin Cancer Behavioral Counseling Counsel parents and patients about minimizing exposure to UV radiation for persons age 6 months to 24 years.
Colorectal Cancer Not routine except for patients at high risk or positive family history. Screenings start at age 50 with frequency either every five or 10 years depending on test type.

Screenings For:

0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Blood Pressure At every doctor’s visit.
Cholesterol Initial screening if not previously tested. Every five years with fasting lipoprotein profile. Every three years with fasting lipoprotein profile
Diabetes Every three years beginning at age 45.Patients who have risk factors such as: age, family history, high blood glucose, overweight, etc., screen more often and at a younger age. Physicians should evaluate blood glucose control and disease complications.
Glaucoma At least once between ages 20-29. Every three to five years if at risk or of African descent. At least twice between ages 30-39. Every two to four years if at risk or of African descent. Every two to four years between ages 40-64.
Osteoporosis Not routine Bone Mineral Density (BMD) testing in women age 65 and older and in younger women at greater risk of fracture
Other All Tests once at baseline: Urinalysis, CBC (RBC), hemoglobin, hematocrit, WBC, rubella titer (females).
Infectious Disease Screenings: 0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Sexually Transmitted Infections (Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis) For Chlamydia and Gonorrhea: Annual screenings for sexually active if under age 25.Patients 25 and over: Screen annually, if at risk. Screen all pregnant women if at risk.For Syphilis: Screen if at risk. Advise about risk factors for STDs.
HIV Universal counseling. Periodic testing of all patients at risk. Screen all pregnant women.
Hepatitis C Screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in persons at high risk for infection.
Tuberculosis (PPD or Tine Test) Tuberculin skin testing for all patients at high risk.
Immunizations 0-1 (Infants) 1-4 (Early childhood) 5-10 (Middle childhood) 11-18 (Adolescence)
Influenza Annual vaccination 6 months to 8 years old (IIV only), one or two doses four weeks apart.Annual vaccination 9-18 years (IIV), one dose.
Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMR) Administer one dose between 12-15 months. One dose between the ages 4 and 6 years. If not previously immunized or incomplete series.
Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13 ) First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third dose at 6 months, and fourth dose between 12 and 15 months Administer one dose of PCV13 to all healthy children aged 24 through 59 months who are not completely vaccinated for their age.Administer PPSV23 to children aged two years and older with certain high-risk conditions.
Diphtheria, Tetanus and acellular Pertussis (DTaP: < 7 years)Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular Pertusis (Tdap: >7 years) Administer DTap first dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third dose at 6 months and fourth dose between ages 15-18 months. Administer DTap fifth dose between the ages 4 and 6 years. Administer Tdap between 11-12 years for those who have completed the recommended childhood DTP/DTaP vaccination series and have not received a booster.11- to 18-year-olds who missed the 11- to 12-year Tdap should receive this dose, followed by a Td booster every 10 years.
Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

 

 

Vaccine series may be started at age 9. Talk to your healthcare provider for details.  
Hepatitis A Not routine. Two-dose series. First dose between 12-23 months Second dose separated between 6-18 months.
Hepatitis B One dose at birth, second dose between 1-2 months and third dose between 6- 18 months. Three-dose series to those not previously immunized or who had an incomplete series.
Meningococcal (MCV) Recommended for children ages 2 months to 10 years of age with certain high-risk medical conditions. One dose at age 11 or 12 with booster dose at age 16.If not previously immunized, one dose at 13-18 years of age, followed by a booster. If first shot is given at 16 years or older, no booster is needed.
Varicella (VAR) (VZV) First dose between 12 and 15 months. Second dose between 4 and 6 years of age.Two doses, if not previously immunized, for ages 7 to 18 years of age.
H. influenzae type b5(Hib) Administer the first dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months and third dose at 6 months. Administer the fourth dose depending on vaccine used in primary series between ages 12-15 months. Not routine. If not previously immunized or incomplete series.
Inactive Poliovirus (IPV: < 18yrs) First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months and third dose between 6-18 months. Administer the fourth dose between the ages of 4 and 6 years. If not previously immunized or incomplete series.
Rotavirus (RV) Two-dose series (RV1) at 2 and 4 months of age, or three-dose series (RV 5) at 2, 4 and 6 months of age      

 

Getting Your Flu Shot

Getting a yearly flu shot protects you and those around you from getting sick. Best of all, your plan covers one shot per flu season. At AvMed, we urge our Members to get annual flu shots and practice preventive measures like:

  • Washing your hands
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Staying home when you’re sick
    Cleaning frequently touched surfaces


Talk to your doctor to get more information about yearly flu shots.